Diabetes

Diabetes is a long-term condition caused by too much glucose, a type of sugar, in the blood. It is also known as diabetes mellitus.

There are two main types of diabetes, which are explained below:

Normally, the amount of sugar in the blood is controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is produced by the pancreas. The pancreas is a gland behind the stomach. When food is digested and enters your bloodstream, insulin moves any glucose out of the blood and into cells, where it is broken down to produce energy.

However, in people with diabetes, the body is unable to break down glucose into energy. This is because there is either not enough insulin to move the glucose, or because the insulin that is there does not work properly.

Our specialist diabetes team will provide you with support, regular reviews and the day-to-day care of your needs.

All Diabetic patients are entitled to an annual review. The Practice will normally contact you if yours is due. The review takes place in two parts – a data collection appointment and where appropriate, a follow up care plan appointment. If you feel you have been missed, or require a more urgent review, then please contact the Practice to arrange an appointment.

At the initial data collection appointment, your blood pressure, weight, urine, feet and well-being will be checked. It is necessary for you to bring an early morning urine sample with you. Following your initial appointment, a care plan booklet will be sent to you and if necessary, an appointment with your GP or one of our specialist nurses will be arranged.

For more information please visit the websites below:

Useful links

Broadmead Surgery’s Diabetes Open Day event – Saturday 23rd June 2018.

The Diabetes Open Day event was well attended by our diabetic patients.  Dr Swain and the team provided information and guidance on diabetes, ways this can impact on day to day living and how to best manage the disease.  Patients were able to share their experiences and ask questions to the team.

Dr Swain welcoming the patients to the meeting.

Dr Swain discussing local diabetic data.

Dr Swain providing information on local targets and how Broadmead Surgery are achieving these.

Dr Swain and Nurse Joy answering patients questions.

Broadmead Surgery staff with the local IAPT representatives.

Healthy snacks were provided.

Our Patient Participation Group (PPG) members were also there to support the event.

The Open Day was very well attended with positive feedback from patients.  As well as having the opportunity to gain further information about their condition, patients were able to take away new blood sugar monitoring equipment if required, useful information leaflets on living with the condition and where to get help and support and promotional free gifts provided by local medical representatives.

 

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For information on how best to be seen at the Surgery, select the service or condition you require..